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90 Day Challenge Day 10

Read Leviticus 26:27 – Numbers 8:14

Today we finish Leviticus and move into Numbers.  The English names of the OT books are taken from the Septuagint (LXX), the Greek translation of the Old Testament which was done between the 2nd and 3rd century BC in Alexandria, Egypt.  The Hebrew names are different, taken typically from the first few words of the book: Bereshith (In the Beginning, Genesis), Shemot (These are the names, Exodus), Vayikra (He called, Leviticus), Bamidbar ( In the Wilderness, Numbers) Devarim (Words, Deuteronomy).

Highlights

  • Valuations
  • Census
  • Arrangement of the camp
  • Levites as priests
  • Firstborn
  • Kohathites, Gershonites, Merarites
  • Defilement
  • Adultery Test
  • Law of Nazirites
  • The famous Benediction
  • The offerings of the leaders
  • The seven lamps, cleansing of Levites

Trivia Question: Name the sons of Levi.

3 Responses

  1. The sons of Levi are Gershon, Kohath and Merari.

    How did the Israelites get a hide from a sea cow in the desert? Perhaps the translation in my Bible is a little loose.

    1. They probably got it from the Egyptians when they plundered them…my version says “porpoise”.

      Here is the definition from the Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament

      (taµash) badger. (ASV seal, marg. porpoise ; RSV leather in Ezek 16:10, elsewhere goat. )

      Except in Num 4:25 and Ezek 16:10, the word is always governed by ±ôr(ôt) ” skin(s), and is therefore doubtless the name of an animal. In Ezek 16:10 it refers to the leather in a woman’s sandals; its thirteen other occurrences (in Exo 25-39 and Num 4) all refer to the skins used in covering the tabernacle and its accessories. Since the badger is rarely if ever seen in Sinai, and since Arabic tu-as “dolphin, ” seems to be cognate to Hebrew taµash, most recent commentators translate the Hebrew word as “dolphin, porpoise, dugong” or the like (RSV “goat, ” though not impossible, lacks cognate language support, as does KJV “badger”). The bottle-nosed dolphin ( Tursiops runcatus) is found in the eastern Mediterranean, while the dugong ( Dugong dugong) is plentiful in the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aqaba; the skin of the latter is still used by Bedouin to make sandals (see Fauna and Flora of the Bible, United Bible Societies, p. 22). If (as seems likely) the taµash was the outermost protective covering of the tabernacle (see especially Num 4:25), the skin of a marine animal like the dolphin or dugong would have been eminently suitable, both for its toughness and for its waterproofing properties.

  2. WOW! How convenient for the Israelites to have had the foresight to bring the hide of whatever marine animal it was with them when they left Egypt! I might have left that behind!

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