Book Review: Atomic Habits

Atomic Habits is a book based on the premise that lasting change and the establishing of habits is the result of making small but powerful changes. This is the reason the word “atomic” is used: atoms are small but full of energy.

Book Review: The Lost World of Genesis One

In the first half of the book Walton lays out an alternative view to the Genesis 1 creation account where he makes the case for a “functional” creation description versus the traditional “material” creation account.

Book Review: After Jesus, Before Christianity

An insightful look at the first two centuries of the followers of Jesus. Asking questions is the strength of this book, the questions and answers are intended to further discussion on the origins of Christianity.

Book Review: History and Eschatology

NT Wright’s strength is his ability to tie things together and paint the big picture of the story of the Bible. And he does that here. Tackling the world of natural theology, he reintroduces modern scholarship to the world of Jesus and 1st Century Judaism.

Book Review: The Brothers Karamazov

A story of 4* brothers full of family dysfunction, tense relationships, jealousy, murder, philosophy, religion, law and culture. This book is what reading was meant to be.

Book Review: Reconstructing the Gospel

A good contribution to the necessary and ongoing conversation of how race has determined the shape of the Christian church in the United States and what needs to happen to fix it.

Book Review: Resurrecting Easter

The premise of the book is that within the tradition of art surrounding the resurrection of Christ there are two distinct types of resurrection images. One he calls the individual resurrection tradition, the other the universal resurrection tradition. The individual resurrection tradition most characterizes the Western Church and the universal resurrection tradition is represented in the East.

Book Review: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas Kuhn is not an easy read. It is a mixture of fascinating summary paragraphs hidden in semi-insider language surrounding science. This is not so much a critique, this is a book on the philosophy and history of science, but a warning that it will take some work to read, especially if you aren’t a scientist.

Book Review: How the Bible Actually Works

Rather than providing us with information to be downloaded, the Bible holds out for us an invitation to join an ancient, well-traveled, and sacred quest to know God, the world we live in, and our place in it.